Never Forget

While many have enjoyed a nice long weekend, remember WHY you can. The freedom we have is all because of those who sacrificed. Take time to give respect and honor those men and women. We should be honoring them everyday, because one day is not near enough. It will never be enough.

Forever grateful. Forever remembering. 

"If you don't love this country, at least honor and celebrate those who have fought and died for the very freedom you use to express your dislike for it!" - David Goggins

- A.Stuebbe

What do you want to change in your life?

What do you want to change in your life?

Seems like a straight forward question, right? Well, it is. 

The answers I have heard are similar from person to person. I WANT to change "this" or I WISH I could do "that". 

Okay... what I hear is that person wanting or wishing for things to change, but where is the WILL?

I WILL improve my mental health. 
I WILL  dedicate myself to getting more in shape. 
I WILL ______ (whatever you PLAN to change). 

I also find myself doing the same thing, but have been working on making myself aware. 

Put your goals into a plan and make it happen. A person cannot be motivated all the time, this is where dedication comes into play. You have to truly want to put forth the effort in order to will the change. There are many days that will be hard, but keep pushing through. 

Have faith in yourself and know that you are worth it. No matter what "change" may mean to you. 

- A. Stuebbe

Perception vs Reality?

I remember reading the short story "An Occurrence At Owl Creek Bridge" By: Ambrose Bierce. 

This story teetered on the cliff of life vs death and perception vs reality. But, this story got my mind questioning the depths of our psyche. 

If you have read this story, you know most of it takes place in Farquhar's "fantasy" his mind conjures as he is minutes from his death. In his fantasy, he creates himself as the town hero or "hero of the south"", and is able to make a daring escape from the Union Soldiers scrap free. 

Reality is still there... waiting. Once he comes back from his "vision", he finds himself hanging off the bridge; meeting his untimely end. 

So, where am I going with this? Let me start by saying that many of us are not comfortable with the idea of our own demise. Throughout our life, we either make peace to accept it or deny it until our last breath. 

Perception and reality. Would you say there is a fine line between the two?

I am sure you have heard of “my life flashed before my eyes” when a near death experience happens.

Constructing questions on the "nature of the Universe" because there is so much to mankind we do not see. Maybe perceptions mask denials and truth. For Farquhar in the short story (minutes before his death), maybe his psyche was able to create a new level of reality...
Think about it. Maybe this perception is one that can not be seen during life, but only given moments before death. 

If any of these random thoughts make sense to you, let me know what you think between the two! 

... and that's the tea. 

- A. Stuebbe

Waiting on the world to change

Sometimes... wait no. Most of the time, I'm exhausted. 
Exhausted of life, how the world is changing and how people are finding more ways to segregate. Forming new ways to isolate and divide society. 

Why? It. Is. Exhausting. Is it not? 
Is it so hard for us to simply live? Together? 

I don't want to sound like a beauty pageant contestant and say "World Peace",  but if the shoe fits...

I know I am not alone out there. I am just another voice hoping to be heard. 

...And that's the tea. 

- A. Stuebbe

Men are deserving too…

Happy wife happy life? But what about happy husband happy life…?

Is this never said simply because it doesn’t rhyme?

I always, ALWAYS hear the first phrase, never the latter. How is that fair? Husband and wife, we are equals. Give each other 100%.

Ladies, if you find yourself reading this, then let this be a reminder that we are not more deserving than our spouse when it comes to happiness. Mom’s are always saying they will raise their sons to treat a women right, but what about your daughters? Teach them to treat men right.

I understand there are good people, and there are bad people. But, there is too much expectation on singling men out for how they treat us. And I am talking about everything aside from common courtesy and being polite. Men need women to go the extra mile and find ways to make them smile. Even if it’s the little things.

So, here’s what I say. Let’s stop the stigma and treat men how they have been told to “treat” us.

… And that’s the tea.

-A.Stuebbe

Where’s the reason?

Why do I see people rushing through life just to get to the next milestone?

Life is fleeting and we never know if our time will be clocked out before we are ready…

Sit down. Grab a cup of coffee or tea. Put your feet up. Get a book. Write. Whatever you want in that moment. But what you do need to do is…. Breathe.

… And that’s the tea.

-A. Stuebbe

Style Analysis: “The Black Cat” By: Edgar Allen Poe

What in the…

Alright, I was at a loss for words through most of the story and at the end I fist-bumped the air like nobody’s business. Like holy freaking crap, the emotions Poe evoked from me were irrevocably insane. My jaw fell straight to the floor when he axed his wife… like what in the heck?! Talk about an escalated plot twist! The tone I got from this story is ironic. While the narrator is trying to convince the audience that he is sane, all the while going into detail about his horrific behavior. In the beginning he states “From infancy I was noted for the docility and humanity of my disposition” (Poe).  Ironic, right? He is the COMPLETE opposite of what he is telling us.  All of the grim events that he inflicted, like stabbing the eye of his cat and then killing it and murdering his wife; he then went on with casual indifference. Acting with out a care and showing no remorse, even as he carefully and meticulously tombs his wife’s body in the wall. By the way… I noticed that after he murdered HIS WIFE, he then refers to her as “the corpse” or “it”. As if she never was and held no importance to him. The ending is also ironic, because the narrator is overly confident with his “burying the wife” skills. Tapping on the wall where his wife resides, unbeknownst that the cat (beast) he so dreadfully despises will meow back and cause his evil deed to be revealed. 

The mood is pretty on point, going with ominous and horrific. Poe provides dark language throughout the story, and even named the cat ‘Pluto” which means roman God of the Underworld. I mean, that right there is gothic and dark. There is superstition with the black cat and the house fire, providing symbolism with the wall left standing with a mark that looks like Pluto when he was hung. The symbol being revenge. Along with superstition, we were then introduced to another cat who resembles Pluto. It is obvious this is horror fiction, because of the narrators cruel intentions and murderous crimes. I even felt half-crazed just reading this, tapping into the mind of an unstable, violent individual. 

Here I just wanted to drop a few examples of figurative language I found in the text. Yes, I know there is more. For this though, I just wanted to keep it short and sweet.

 SIMILE – “But my disease grew upon me — for what disease is like alcohol!” (Poe). Obviously comparing alcohol to a disease, amplifying the negative effects of alcohol. Perhaps Poe has experienced the ill effect of alcohol firsthand, since the narrator in the story is consumed by it from beginning to end. 

HYPERBOLE – “The fury of a demon instantly possessed me.” (Poe). Clearly exaggerated, but another way to show his violent side from his indulgence of alcohol. Showing us his short fuse and bad temper, allowing his rage to take over. A way to let the audience know that he was so angry, he was seeing red. 

PERSONIFICATION – “I was aroused from sleep by the cry of fire.” (Poe). Fires do not not literally cry, but it provides us a way to envision the sound that woke him up. Giving sound effects to create the atmosphere being told. 

By: A.Stuebbe

Poe, Edgar Allen. “The Black Cat”. 1845. https://poestories.com/read/blackcat